[Music] What’s going on guys? Dr. Jubbal, medschoolinsiders.com. I’m currently out here in Saigon, that’s Ho
Chi Minh City, Vietnam. And I’m having a blast! The trip so far has been quite epic. If you want to follow along, make sure you’re
following me on Instagram @KevinJubbalMD. Now, it wasn’t really until this trip that
I fully understood how important and how powerful social media is. If you saw my recent video with Dokt. Aura, then you know what I’m talking about. Now, I had the pleasure of having an excellent
conversation with Jay Feldman. He is huge on Instagram, so if you haven’t
already checked him out then make sure you do. And he’s also a fourth-year osteopathic medical
student in New York City. Currently applying to family medicine residency. So without further ado, here is Jay Feldman. How’s it going guys? My name is Jay Feldman. I’m a fourth year Medical Student here in
New York City at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine. I grew up in South Florida, lived in Parkland
and I did my undergraduate at University of Florida. There I studied biological science, played
professional volleyball and then I moved up here and I’m about to match and I’m hoping
I match. And I’m doing a family medicine specialty. Super exciting time. First off, congratulations. Now that you are wrapping up medical school
and you’re looking back, how has the reality of med school actually differed from your
expectations? Oh, man! All right, so, my expectations of medical
school versus the reality. So, I was in Florida, University of Florida
and I got my acceptance letter. I actually got accepted on the spot at Touro. I was in my interview and they offered me
the position while I was there. ‘The position’, the enrollment as a student. But once that happens, you’re just committed. I mean, your expectations from your family
and friends, everyone knows and then – that’s what you’re doing, that’s your new life. Your new life is medicine, its medical school. So, you just uproot, uh, you know, I packed
up all my stuff from University of Florida, moved it to New York, didn’t know anybody
and really just started on a grueling two years of being broke, depressed. I mean, if you’re not depressed your first
two years of medical school, there’s something wrong with you. It’s grueling. It’s harder than anyone can actually put into
words. People will tell you how hard medical school is,
you have no idea. Absolutely no idea. So, you know, when you’re thinking about going
to medical school and you’re basing your decisions off of your parents’ beliefs and you’re basing
your decisions off of what you’ve seen on TV, Grey’s Anatomy, Scrubs, The Resident,
you know, all these shows now, it’s not glamorous, none of it is glamorous. You see cool things, yeah, but that’s the
vast minority of what you’re doing. The reality of medicine is, you’re basically
a slave, you’re working your ass off, you’re studying your ass off every single day. When you’re a third or fourth year and you’re
actually seeing patients, you’re getting to the hospital sometimes at 5:00 a.m. every
day and not getting out until 8:00. And the whole time you’re there, you’re just
being – eating crap from your seniors and it’s not fun. And people really, you know, there’s a lot
of depression that happens for this reason. It looks glamorous, people get into it, yeah,
money, prestige, but it’s not like that at all. Granted I love what I’m learning, I love what
I’m seeing, I’ve seen some incredible things that I wouldn’t trade the world for. But since I started medical school, you know,
I’ve lost all of my best friends from high school. No one understands what you’re going through
except your classmates. So, it’s just an inevitable reality that the
people you were once close with in college are not going to be the people you’re close
with anymore. You know, you’re just basically, you’re signing
up for a lot of years of struggle, of being broke, of working your ass off harder than
you can ever imagine working, but it’s rewarding in a lot of ways. You have a large Instagram following and the
life of a med student seems great; you’re smiling, you’re rocking the white coat, the
stethoscope and you just seem to be having an awesome time. Is this really what medical school is like
for you? So, no and yes in a lot of ways. So, I know everything that I post is, you
know, smiling in my white coat, my scrubs and my stethoscope, like being a doctor is
awesome, I love what I do and that’s true in a lot of ways, but I also think I’m contributing
to a major problem. And that’s portraying only the positive sides
of what I – what we go through as medical students. And me personally, I’m a serial optimist. I mean, you could put a plunger in my hand
and I would probably be posting on social media about how awesome it is to be a plumber. But, you know, medicine is really not like
that for everyone. I am the, I would say 1% of people that are
in medical school in terms of finding life balance and finding happiness there. So, no, it’s not all smiles and white coats. There’s a lot of people and including myself,
I go through hard times too but nobody posts the hard times on social media. And even when I did one time, all my friends
were like “man you can’t do that, people are looking to you for inspiration, for smiles”. And I agree with them and I disagree with
them. I think people should see the hard times. But for now, I’m just going to, you know,
right now I’m in a very optimistic place. I love what I do. I found a way to make it work for me in a
way that keeps me happy, keeps me motivated and makes me love medicine. But a lot of people can’t say the same. For every doctor on social media you see with
their white coat smiling and their stethoscope, there’s a hundred other ones that are not
so happy. And I think it’s creating a pretty big public
perception problem that, you know, being a doctor is this glamorous fun thing and everyone
– everyone is happy and having fun. And that’s simply not true. Great point. Great point. Now, this is clearly a huge issue in medicine;
do you have any advice for aspiring future doctors, for the pre-meds out there? So, I would love to be able to sit down with
the freshman and sophomore in college who are thinking about going pre-med or just at the
beginning of their stage and see if this is really a road that’s right for them because
once you really start on this path, it’s really hard to get off. My biggest piece of advice would be just understand
what you’re signing up for. As soon as you start really getting deep into
your pre-med classes, you wanna go to physics too, you start telling all your friends and
family that you’re going to be a doctor. Putting it out into the world like that is
really kind of committing yourself into this life. And once you – the deeper you get, the harder
is to get out. And I want to get across the message that,
if you’re not 100% sure, if you have shadowed doctors, seen, talk to them, listen to them
about what their life is actually like, do they recommend it for you… If you’re not 100% sure, then really sit down
and think about this because it’s not your parents or your friends that are going to
have to go through this and live this life for their entire life, it’s you. So, I really think that you should take a
deep look because once you actually get accepted to medical school, congratulations, but now
you have to take on all this debt. You take on all of this debt and if you don’t
end up scoring high enough to be the specialty that you always thought you were going to
be, and this happens to 90% of medical students, It’ll probably happen to you too, will you
be okay being, you know, a primary care doctor or a psychiatrist or a family doctor your
whole life? Now, these are all very important questions
because once you start, this is really a commitment for your entire life. Once you have all this debt, I have $400,
000 in debt, there’s really no escape. And this is feeling of being trapped that
leads a lot of physicians to being depressed and committing suicide. That was a very complex and multifaceted issue. What do you think are the next steps in terms
of us as a community, as medical influencers, what can we do to address this… at least
to start making meaningful change? So, I’m glad you ask and the solution I think
is going to be tough, but raising awareness, doing exactly what you’re doing right now
with the Save Our Doctors campaign, you know, raising money, raising awareness for this
specific cause. And I think us as social media influencers
and people in media, also have a responsibility to not only show the – the good things, not
only show the white coats and smiles and how awesome it is to be a doctor, but also showing
the, you know, the highlight of what goes on behind the scenes. You know, how hard it really is. How many hours we actually work. Are you ready to get up at 4:00 AM every day? I mean, I’ve went through entire months periods
where it was just like waking up, just shit. But you know, I think if all the social media
influencers and media really band together and change the public perception of medicine
by at least highlighting what it’s actually like, the work that we actually do, what it’s
like in the hospital, then I think people might at an earlier age really grasp what
it means to be a doctor. And I don’t think they’re doing that now. Jay, thank you so much for your time. Really a pleasure talking to you and having
you on this channel. Where can people learn more and find you online? So, if you want to connect with me on social
media, I’m everywhere… on Instagram @drJayFeldman. That’s Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter,
YouTube, you can find me on all of those links @drJayFeldman and drjayfeldman.com which
is launching on March 15th as well when I match. I hope this isn’t bad juju. It was great talking to everybody and I hope
to connect with you. If you have any questions feel free to shoot
me a message on any of those social media platforms. I’ll be sure to answer you. [Music]

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