I’ve got an interesting question here or a
comment from a subscriber. So, I’m going to reply to this one. Help, my GI doc wants to surgically remove
my colon or parts of my colon. Well, he wants to cut out parts of my intestines
because the pharmaceutical drugs aren’t working anymore. Please help me. So, it looks like this person took a gut motility
test and the GI doc wants to cut out sections of the bowel that he or she doesn’t deem to
be working properly. So, I’ve regularly seen patients over the
years that have been under the knife for all sorts of weird reasons. Surgery has come a long way and these surgeons
perform incredible jobs. Absolutely incredible job’s when you look
at it. But it’s becoming now microsurgery, very small
keyhole with tiny little lenses they can see through. And it’s quite different from the old days
when they literally slashed people open. But I want you to remember something interesting,
around 1900, I think it was in New York, 100s and 100s of operations were performed on patients. This is only, what a hundred and something
years ago, 120 years ago? 100s of operations were performed to remove
parts of the colon because the person was constipated. So, back then if you couldn’t poop and the
doctor would refer you to a surgeon, they just chop a bit of the bowel out and of course,
then you’d be pooping like a racehorse, like a duck. Okay, so you went from one extreme to the
other. So, it was quite common. If we go back to the 50s, it was very common
to take tonsils out. Lots of people just had their tonsils taken
out. You go [inaudible 00:01:37], ooh, we better
take that tonsil out. So, it was very common. If we go back further, the thymus gland were
removed from kid’s chests before that because they thought they were useless organs. And many doctors still remove appendices and
things that they say, “Oh, they’re probably useless.” No part of the body is useless. Surgery is never something I ever recommend
for people to take lightly. It’s only as an extreme last resort. So, what the person is saying here is because
the drugs aren’t working well, maybe the GI docs not working. Okay, maybe the guy’s got a glass of wine
in hand and a golf club in the other and he can’t be bothered looking at you or talking
to you as a patient. You need to find an alternative medicine doctor. I still for the life of me can’t work out
why they use the word alternative. Drugs should be the alternative. Okay. We should be seen as primary, not alternative. So, when patients have dysfunctional gut function,
first port of call is your naturopath, not the GI doc. That is if the naturopaths experienced and
trained also in medical and understand the severity of GI complaints. Acute abdomen of course, is straight for the
emergency room, but a chronic ongoing one is best kept away from the doctor unless the
patient wants to feel sicker. Docs and no good at longterm chronic gut complaints. I’ve worked that out. They’re great for acute. You get a burst appendix, well, you’re not
going to go to a chiropractor for a burst appendix, are you? You’re probably going to go to a GI doc. That’s exceptions. There’s always exceptions. But when we get irritable bowel syndrome and
gas and bloating and constipation, these functional disturbances need to be nailed down there
and then. They need to be fixed up in the early stages
and not left until pathology develops over time. All right. Playing the fiddle while Rome burns, is not
a good idea. You need to get onto the fire before it engulfs
the whole city. Inflammation starts often in the GI tract
and slowly spreads its way out to the rest of the body. Doctors have not got the training to understand
on the proper assessment and treatment of functional GI disorders. And that’s a fact. And I don’t care what comments I get on this
video. I’ve been in this business long enough to
know that you don’t go to a average doctor for a gut complaint. You’re better off going to someone who knows
stool testing and can work with diet and some supplements instead of drugs, like antibiotics,
to get the gut in order. So, what are we going to help this person
with? Surgically remove my colon. Well, I would highly recommend that this person
go and seek the aid of an experienced functional medicine doctor and likely get stool testing
completed and not have any surgical intervention until it’s absolutely necessary. These are the sort of patients I’ve seen over
the years that had they hadn’t seen me, they would have had their bowel removed or part
of their bowel removed. I’ve seen many cases like that. And all these patients generally required
was a proper stool test, a good analysis of the results and then a treatment. It either involves reducing inflammatory markers
in the gut or it could have involved working on a yeast problem we saw there or a bacterial
issue, something like that. And generally, that’s when the pain goes down. But it could also mean another issue this
patient needs checking out. It could be some other type of issue going
on there with the gut. And often these things can be found out again
through appropriate functional medicine testing. So, let’s put the knife away for an hour. All right. And let’s get a proper assessment of the gut
from a functional perspective before we start playing with knives. Because once you pull a knife out the drawer
and started making cuts, unfortunately, you can’t really put that bowel back together
again. Yep. My father in law had major problems with his
gut for so long. He had bottles of PPI drugs lined up in his
shed, two feet of PPI bottles just sitting there because he had so many gut problems. But when I saw when the old man was eating
and drinking, I soon realized where the gut problem came from. Right. Cause and effect. So again, in this patient’s case, the patient
needs a lot of work with the diet and the lifestyle to remedy these things, to prevent
the knife now and also to stop the knife in the future. Because once you cut, you can’t go back. That’s how it is. Thanks for tuning in. I always appreciate viewers and subscribers. Thank you.

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