Inside your ear, sounds set off a complex chain of events. They enter as pressure waves which push and pull your eardrum, making it vibrate. On the other side of the eardrum, these vibrations set a series of bones jiggling. They end with the smallest bone in your entire body, called the stirrup. It’s smaller than a grain of rice. These bones allow you to hear. If a sound is too loud, a muscle pulls the stirrup away from the most sensitive parts. Temporarily at least, you go a bit deaf but the rest of your ear is protected. Beyond the stirrup is a fluid-filled cavity, your Cochlea. The incoming sound waves tickle clumps of tiny hairlike sensors on the floor. These begin to dance to the sounds of the world outside. You have 30,000 sensors. Each picks out a different part of the sound and sends it straight to your brain.

100 thoughts on “How your ear works – Inside the Human Body: Building Your Brain – BBC One”

  1. The outer ear canal is said to have a resonant frequeny around 4000-6000 Hz. If a 100 Hz tone and a 5000 Hz tone is presented outisde the ear canal, and the intensity of the tones are measured in the ear canal, which tone would be louder? Also, in the human auditory system, if a complex wave composed of a 1200 Hz tone and a 1800 Hz tone is presented, the person will preceive a 600 Hz. Does the human auditory system act like a linear or nonlinear filter?

  2. I enjoy the simplicty of these videos they are so great for me and my daughter who i home school . thank you so much !!

  3. There is some evidence that frequencies within the range of the human voice are propagated more efficiently than other frequencies – they are certainly perceived as louder, but this could be due to imporved sensitivity in the cochlea, rather than properties of the outer ear. The cochlea is not linear in its abuility to distinguish frequencies, since it is tuned to the human voice.

  4. i have negative ear pressure( or reverse ear pressure whatever) and a hole in both of my eardrums. how can i still hear? none of my ear doctors could ever explain it

  5. Not exactly when it gets to the hair-like projections. There are hair like projections but the way the video shows it in the cochlea isn't exactly the mechanics/set-up of the cochlea.

  6. Ah no. Evolution is based on self replicating molecules, natural selection and mutation. Some good, some bad, some random. Evolution is the change in the inherited characteristics of biological populations over successive generations. Evolutionary processes give rise to diversity at every level of biological organisation, including species, individual organisms and molecules such as DNA and proteins.

  7. it makes me proud being what i was creted for,finding the purpose of life and why it was created and by who it was made by.

  8. inside you ear sounds set off a complex chain of events, they enter as pressure waves that push and pull your eardrum making it vibrate. On the other side of the eardrum these vibrations set a series of bone jiggling. they end with the smallest bone in your entire body, called the stirrup. It is smaller than a grain of rice. these bones allow you to hear. if a sound is too loud a muscle pulls the stirrup away from the most sensitive parts.

  9. temporally at least you go a bit deaf but the rest of your ear is protected. Beyond the stirrup is a fluid filled (cavern or cavity…i can't tell what hes saying) your coclia. The incoming sound waves tickle clumps of tiny hair like sensors on the floor, these begin to dance to the world outside. you have 30000 sensors each picks out a different part of the sound and sends it straight to your brain.

  10. It would be a shame if you did not build muscle when normal people are able to bulk up easily using MAD Muscle Ripper (search for it on google).

  11. I got a question. Since I have absolute hearing, meaning that i can tune instrument with just my ears and no tuner, means that i got more than 30 000 sensors?

  12. I believe it would be better if you can talk more about the cochlea, its structure and how its structure make it hear sound with different frequency.

  13. I would love to show my students this video – I'm teaching disadvantaged children in rural South Africa 🙂

  14. you're also not suppose to use qtips. your earwax is a defense and protection to the eardrum, we think it's gross but it has a purpose

  15. I know my hearing isn't what it used to be, but damn they should of lowered the volume of the background music so I could at least hear the narrator better….

  16. Ali ibn Abi Talib(peace be upon him) ( 599 – 661 – AC) said
    ((you must Be surprised for that Human}}}}}
    his sight by a fat and talking by meat (tongue)
    {{{{and hears by a bone (ear) <<<<<<<<<<
    **********************
    From Book Nahjul balagha for
    Ali Ibn Abi Talib

  17. I really don't know why people are talking about god in the comment section here!!!!!! I would like to show this video clip to my class, but the incidental music is so loud you can barely hear the narration!! Ridiculous!

  18. OK, the dancing part of the hair like structures is incorrect, that is not how our ears work. It is more complicated than that. But for the general audience to make it simple, it is OK.

  19. sorry. Had to skip this song. God bless you though! Still a wonderful job with the majority of songs, just a great pleasure, keep it up!!!

  20. Clearly such a complex system require intelligence in order to be built, not just simple intelligence but complex intelligence as the system itself. Thank you Lord for revealing your omniscient nature to us!

  21. What an idiot people comments "God is awesome". There is no God

    When you die, you just dead. There is no afterlife and heaven

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