A traumatic brain injury, or TBI, is a disruption in brain function
caused by an external blow to the head. And when you hear that definition, you might think about sports
and professional athletes, since it’s the kind of injury
we’re used to seeing on the playing field. And this imagery has really come
to define TBI in the public consciousness. I myself do research on TBI
in retired and college athletes. I stood on a TED stage in 2010, talking about concussions in kids’ sports. So I have to say, as someone
who researches and treats these injuries, that I’ve been really gratified
to see the growing awareness of TBI and specifically, the short-
and long-term risks to athletes. Today, though, I want to introduce you
to a larger but no less controversial group of people impacted
by traumatic brain injury, who don’t often show up in the headlines. I’ve come to recognize
these inmates and probationers as surprisingly among the most
vulnerable members of society. For the last six years, my colleagues
and I have been doing research that has completely changed the way
we think about the criminal justice system and the people in it. And it may change the way
you think about those things, too. So I’ll start with a shocking statistic: 50 to 80 percent of people
in criminal justice have a traumatic brain injury. Up to 80 percent. In the general public,
in this room, for example, that number is less than five percent. And I’m not just talking about
getting your bell rung. These are the kinds of injuries
that require hospitalization. Most of them are the product
of a physical assault, and some of them
are actually sustained in jail. All of these numbers are even higher
among the women in criminal justice. Almost every single woman
in the criminal justice system has been exposed to interpersonal
violence and abuse. More than half of these women have
been exposed to repeated brain injuries. In this way, these women’s brains look
like the brains of retired NFL players, and they’ll likely face the same risks
for dementing diseases as they age. The same risks. TBI, together with mental illness
and substance abuse and trauma, makes it hard for people to think. They have cognitive impairments like
poor judgment and poor impulse control, problems that make
criminal justice a revolving door. People get arrested and booked into jail. They oftentimes get into trouble
while they’re in there. They get into fights.
They fall out of their bunk. And then they get released
and do stupid things, like forgetting mandatory check-ins,
and they get rearrested. Statistically speaking, they’re actually more likely
to be rearrested than not. A colleague calls this “serving
a life sentence 30 days at a time.” And oftentimes, these folks don’t know
why this is so hard for them. They feel out of control and frustrated. So knowing that TBI is at the root
of so many of these challenges, the mission for a group of us in Colorado
has been to disrupt that cycle, to jam the revolving the door. So working together
with my state and local partners, we crafted a plan
to meet everyone’s needs: the system, the inmates and probationers, my graduate students. In this program, we assess
how each person’s brain works so that we can recommend
basic modifications to make this system more effective and safer. And here when I say “safer,”
I mean safer not only for the inmates, but safer also for correctional staff. In some ways, this is
such a simple approach. We’re not treating the brain injury, we’re treating the underlying problem
that gets people into all of this trouble in the first place. We do quick neuropsychological
screening tests to identify strengths and weaknesses
in the way an inmate thinks. Using that information,
we write two reports. One, a report for the system with specific recommendations
on how to manage that inmate. The other is a letter to the inmate with specific suggestions
for how to manage themselves. For example, if our test result suggests
that a probationer has a hard time remembering the things they hear, that would be an auditory memory deficit. In that case, our letter
to the court might suggest that that probationer get handouts
of important information. And our letter to that probationer
would say, among other things, that they should carry a notebook
to record that information for themselves. Now, most importantly, is that I pause here
to be really clear about one point. This program does not
minimize responsibility or make excuses for anyone’s behavior. This is about changing longstanding
negative perceptions and building self-advocacy. It’s actually about taking responsibility. The inmates move from, “I’m a total screwup, I’m a loser,” to, “Here’s what I don’t do well, and here’s what I have to do about it.” (Applause) And the system comes to see
an inmate’s problematic behavior as the things they can’t do versus the things they won’t do. And that change — seeing behavior as a deficit
rather than outright defiance — is everything in these settings. We hear from inmates around the country, and they write, and more than anything,
they want to know how to help themselves. This is an excerpt from a letter
from Troy in Virginia, an excerpt from a 50-page letter. And he writes, “Can you tell me what you think
of all the head traumas I’ve dealt with? What can I do? Can you help me?” Closer to home, we have
thousands of stories like this, and smart stories, stories
that have a great outcome. Here’s Vinny. Vinny was hit by a car when he was 15, and from that moment forward,
spent more time in jail than in school. With some basic skill-building, after our assessment revealed that he had some pretty
significant memory impairments, Vinny learned to use the alarm
and reminder function on his iPhone to track important appointments, and he keeps a checklist
to break larger tasks into smaller, manageable ones. And with basic tools
like that under his belt, Vinny’s been out of jail for two years, clean for nine months, and recently back to work. (Applause) What’s so striking for Vinny is that this is his first time
off of court supervision since his injury more than 15 years ago. He made it out of the revolving door. (Applause) He says now, “I can do anything. I just have to work
a lot harder at it.” (Laughs) And here’s Thomas. Thomas has some pretty significant
attention and behavior problems after an injury landed him in a coma
for more than a month. After relearning how to walk, his first stop? Court. He couldn’t imagine a future
where he wasn’t in trouble. He now carries a calendar
to avoid being held in contempt for missed court dates, and he schedules a break
into his day every day to recharge before he gets agitated. And nobody knows the revolving door better than the person sitting
at the front of the courtroom. This is my good friend and colleague
Judge Brian Bowen. Now, Judge Bowen was already on a mission
to make the system work for everyone, and when he heard about this program,
he saw the perfect fit. He actually sits down
with all of his prosecutors to help them see that there’s basically
two categories of defendants in the courtroom: the ones we’re afraid of —
oftentimes, rightfully so — and the ones we’re mad at. These are the ones who miss
all of their scheduled appointments and they blow through
the best-laid probation plans. And Judge Bowen believes that,
with a little more support, we could move people
in this latter category, the maddening category, through and ultimately out of the system. He proved that with Navy veteran Mike. Judge Bowen saw the correlation between
Mike’s history of a massive 70-foot fall and his long-standing pattern
of difficulty showing up on the right day for court appointments and complying with mandatory
therapy requirements, for example. And instead of sentencing him
to more and more jail time, Judge Bowen sent him home
with maps and checklists and handouts and recommended instead
vocational rehabilitation and flexible scheduling
for those therapies. And this with those supports,
Mike’s back to work for the first time since his injury
while he was in the service. He’s repairing relationships
with his family, and just last month, he graduated from
Judge Bowen’s veteran’s court. (Applause) This program shows us
the overwhelming prevalence of traumatic brain injuries
and cognitive deficits and the accumulation of brokenness
in the criminal justice system. And it highlights the extraordinary power
of resilience and responsibility. In Mike and Thomas and Vinny, even Judge Bowen’s story, you saw the transformation made possible
by a change in perception and some simple accommodations. All told, in this program, these inmates and probationers
come to see themselves differently. The system sees them differently, and when you meet them in the community,
I hope you see them differently, too. Thanks, guys. (Applause)

100 thoughts on “The surprising connection between brain injuries and crime | Kim Gorgens”

  1. I’ve suspected this for quite some time. I did 6 months in jail about 10 years ago (haven’t been back) and I noticed how nearly everyone in there had behavioral issues and general mental issues. My bunk mate and myself used to debate this all the time and we always ended by saying that someone needed to look into it. Glad someone cares enough about these forgotten members of our society to actually research it.

  2. "doesn't resolve of responsibility" nice memes from the US once again

    You remove responsibility from kids, mentally handicapped people and from mentally ill people. Given the circumstances or the ability all these 3 groups would commit crimes.

    but once it is an adult that has a similar deficit, no, that's when you just shove them into prison which of course causes them to be more like the 3 groups mentioned. As I mentioned kids, mentally handicapped and mentally ill and from US prisons you (generally) come out more stupid and you mental health deteriorates. But then you make no attempt to fix their situation and guess what happens.

    It's basic science Americans, no normal human being is by nature bad, so no one should be in prison in the current definition of it or be punished. The closest thing to evil is corrupt politicians, corrupt police or any high tier citizen which despite not fitting into kid, mentally handicapped, mentally ill still end up doing evil. Guess what, these are the people less likely to be in prison because they have the means to avoid it and (in a positive note) control it within the bounds of legality.

    but even they could be mentally ill or have personality problems we as of yet don't see as a risk.

  3. I hope somewhere sooner in the future, we'll be able to correctly rewrite and help heal the brain of people that have suffered traumatic brain injuries. I have sympathy for criminals, of course they are still dangerous, but it's not "them" it's their brain that's causing a problem.

  4. So that explains the leftists lies and crime.Now can we remove the brain damage before the body is affected?

  5. Does anyone know if similar connections have been made regarding severe nutritional deficits during childhood? I mean, specifically, correlations between severe childhood malnutrition and crime. They already know that malnutrition during the developmental stages negatively affects intelligence/IQ (among other things), but have they formally studied its influence on committing crimes?

  6. Sorry but where does she get the figures that 50%-80% of men in jail have brain injuries and 100% of women. Sorry but I’m not sure that is true!!

  7. I used to train MMA, I get hit in the head a lot… So now i know why I make illegal U-turns when the sign clear says not to

    🎭

  8. I hope I can find the research online. If this turns out true (which I hardly believe) it can be revolutionary

  9. I got DDT slammed when I was a kid so bad I couldnt see for 5 minutes. I had a headache for a week. I couldnt sleep right. I was at the end of 5th grade. In every grade after that , until I dropped out, I was in fights. A lot of fights. I fought any boy that acted rude towards me. Maybe it was just puberty…..

  10. Kim Gorgens? More like Kim GORGEOUS! What a milf!

    In all seriousness, interesting topic. I would have never connected the two points.

  11. Every trauma is an open door for demons. The answer for everything is Jesus, His word is what we need to obey to be heald and spread truth and love.

  12. I don't know if there is no or not.
    However….I think I got many injuries of brain.so I really see and feel shame .because I become extremely agressive.
    Sometimes I'm ruining materials in my house.just for avoiding to injure anyone in that moment.its really horrible.

  13. Black may prove to have more brain injuries from their environment. In America we have cultured 44% of our black women to abort their babies. After the South lost the Civil War the Democrats implemented a long term plan to lower the Black population.  The plan is working very well. Amazingly most blacks still love the Democrat Plantation Party. In NYC the black abortion rate is 60%

  14. I have brain damage and no one will help me! In 2006 I was hit with a baseball in the temple and had to get my skull opened for the brain to swell. Became a elevator mechanic in 2007 and in 2012 started having concentration problems and other things and have been trying to get help ever since. As of 8 months ago it sounds like a little girl is screaming in my head all day all night. My frustration is through the roof because no one will help so I understand why people with brain injuries might break the law more often. If I do not get help soon I have a feeling I will end up in jail. Just spent my savings so time is running out.

  15. Oh, the applause and emotional animator works fine…in right time, right timings for produce more intensive applause and suggested affirmation.

    This statement isn´t considerate. But thats not ignorable conspicuous. Maybe her husband encourages his Wifes professions and message?

    Help in heavy life situation are fine. traumatisation is a whide and diverse manipulation of the optimistic behavior. But when this would be a new method to domesticate fellow men to versions of nicest and acquiescentest creation of selfish motive elites, than theres a fundamental problem. The todays elites can be tomorrows total failures. And if all human be alike and equalished, then the End of humankind would comes nearer, then desired.

    To what the usual domestication-attempts and idealism-imperialism to bring in all environments guided, we can see in the modern Problems in the environment and biotopes: destruction of enviroment and biotopes and life therein. what 12 thausend years zivilisation leave behind, we can see in north-Afrika and the drought-belt up to the Himalaya (Pakistan). Dead landscape overall.

    The human ideas of Being and Shall / To be and shall is the problem, not the other being.

    Darüber hinaus sind solche Strategien, die Menschen mit sich selbst zu konfrontieren, eine sichere Möglichkeit, souveräne Menschen zu destabilisieren. Was ja ein Ziel ist, wenn man annimmt, diese Gefängnisinsassen seien "böse" und unkontrollierbar. Souveränität von Individuen hat auch ihre Kosten für die Gesellschaft. Besser wäre es, wenn man die Gesellschaft daraufhin konditioniert, Anderssein zu akzeptieren und… das Fremde nicht automatisch affektiv und gewaltsam/agressiv abzuweisen. Ignoranz und Hinnahme von Anderen ist die besser Strategie, woraus dann weniger verschleppte Traumata zu Gewalttaten werden, als wenn man durch Traumata bedingte Gewaltanwendung mit Gewaltanwendung zu kurieren meint zu müssen.

    Un ddas Therapien welcher Art auch immer, auch als Traauma erfahren werden oder auch so wirken können, habe ich am eigenen Leben erfahren müssen. Denn worauf diese Therapie setzt, ist, dass man Gegenwehr mit in Ohnmacht versetzende Zwangsmaßnahmen beantwortet. Das ist das Schleifen von Seelen mit der Rechtfertigung, diese Seele sei böse.

    Dabei ist das Missverhältnis zwischen der Idee von Geerechtigkeit und der real existierenden Gerechtigkeits-Schere eine der zentralen Ursachen jeder Gewalt, die ausgeübt wird. Und gegen ein Gerechtigkeitsempfinden derart gewaltsam vorzugehen, hat erhebliche Folgen für die eigene Rechtfertigung und für die Betroffenen, die ab der "erfolgreichen" Therapie seelenlose Hüllen sind, anstatt von Lebensqualität strotzende Existenzen.

  16. Oh, the applause and emotional animator works fine…in right time, right timings for produce more intensive applause and suggested affirmation.

    This statement isn´t considerate. But thats not ignorable conspicuous. Maybe her husband encourages his Wifes professions and message?

    Help in heavy life situation are fine. traumatisation is a whide and diverse manipulation of the optimistic behavior. But when this would be a new method to domesticate fellow men to versions of nicest and acquiescentest creation of selfish motive elites, than theres a fundamental problem. The todays elites can be tomorrows total failures. And if all human be alike and equalished, then the End of humankind would comes nearer, then desired.

    To what the usual domestication-attempts and idealism-imperialism to bring in all environments guided, we can see in the modern Problems in the environment and biotopes: destruction of enviroment and biotopes and life therein. what 12 thausend years zivilisation leave behind, we can see in north-Afrika and the drought-belt up to the Himalaya (Pakistan). Dead landscape overall.

    The human ideas of Being and Shall / To be and shall is the problem, not the other being.

    Darüber hinaus sind solche Strategien, die Menschen mit sich selbst zu konfrontieren, eine sichere Möglichkeit, souveräne Menschen zu destabilisieren. Was ja ein Ziel ist, wenn man annimmt, diese Gefängnisinsassen seien "böse" und unkontrollierbar. Souveränität von Individuen hat auch ihre Kosten für die Gesellschaft. Besser wäre es, wenn man die Gesellschaft daraufhin konditioniert, Anderssein zu akzeptieren und… das Fremde nicht automatisch affektiv und gewaltsam/agressiv abzuweisen. Ignoranz und Hinnahme von Anderen ist die besser Strategie, woraus dann weniger verschleppte Traumata zu Gewalttaten werden, als wenn man durch Traumata bedingte Gewaltanwendung mit Gewaltanwendung zu kurieren meint zu müssen.

    Un ddas Therapien welcher Art auch immer, auch als Traauma erfahren werden oder auch so wirken können, habe ich am eigenen Leben erfahren müssen. Denn worauf diese Therapie setzt, ist, dass man Gegenwehr mit in Ohnmacht versetzende Zwangsmaßnahmen beantwortet. Das ist das Schleifen von Seelen mit der Rechtfertigung, diese Seele sei böse.

    Dabei ist das Missverhältnis zwischen der Idee von Geerechtigkeit und der real existierenden Gerechtigkeits-Schere eine der zentralen Ursachen jeder Gewalt, die ausgeübt wird. Und gegen ein Gerechtigkeitsempfinden derart gewaltsam vorzugehen, hat erhebliche Folgen für die eigene Rechtfertigung und für die Betroffenen, die ab der "erfolgreichen" Therapie seelenlose Hüllen sind, anstatt von Lebensqualität strotzende Existenzen.

  17. Are there studies linking TBI to homelessness?  I have to think that there must be a connection there as well.

  18. What about the wisdom in the film series "Westworld", where it is explained that complex consciousness can only be achieved through "traumatizations"?

    If this is true, then … any therapy for misdevelopment or underdevelopment consists of burning in new self-reflection scenarios through traumatization, which expand the existing consciousness to the effect that these people are then designed affectively or through behavioristic conditioning automated reactions to the environment submissive.

    In contrast, a global player in the economy who decides every day on the well-being and woe (and salary) of the employee in his conglomerate is almost a super villain. And may it be legal. In contrast to a possibly still childhood traumatized person, to whom the traumatization was done so that the character of this person (out of the powerlessness of this traumatizing situation) continues to live his life submissively.

  19. At least 30% of murders on men are visual anti homicides . because the women is believed. Yes feminism requires lots neuro pruning self dumbing.
    The the excuses made for the Cowards against Cosby. And the striking inconsistencies inconstencies in stories are normal victim behavior 🤔. And those experts also say False rape accusations are rare.
    But just turn on two Neurons

  20. Excellent, hopeful information but puzzled and irritated by the occasional laughs of the presenter.

  21. While the primary role of neurosurgery is the training of more neurosurgeons, the vicious circle of its academic victims with brain damage will not be broken.

  22. 50 to 80%…. Wow, I'm thrilled by your ability to research and compile honest information… No, you don't get to be taken seriously when you expect me to swallow a 30% discrepancy in your research. I've had two severe head injuries as a child(under 10) and multiple minor head injuries(enough to floor me if not outright knock me unconscious) as an adult, and I've never been in the penal system nor have I committed a prison-able crime… I've sped while driving and I've been really fucking rude to people(not often thankfully). You're using TBI to push prison reform… while I agree that prison reform is Very important I don't agree with obscuring the issue with bad science!!! You'll end up hurting the push for reform by pushing false facts and bad research… people won't take the issue seriously because they can't take your argument seriously! You should be ashamed, not of yourself, but of hurting an important issue with BAD science!!! You use feel good stories that don't positively prove your idea, but prove the truth; the truth is the reform programs in order to stop recidivism Work!

  23. Tell me about it. I was a severely abused infant and toddler that unfortunately survived. I have to be very careful. Cultists know precisely how to manipulate this condition while pretending to be a friend. It's called gangstalking or cointelpro. They think it's funny. I am surprised I have been able to accomplish anything good.

  24. The median is exactly 50%, not 50 to 80 like stated here in plain vulgar fashion – Bigger the ego, bigger the story ?

  25. Neuroscience is quickly bringing an end to the entire judicial system. With all these kinds of developments I sincerely hope that we'll be able to move past this juvenile blame game, take collective responsibility, and start focusing our efforts on preventative actions and integration efforts instead of punishment and incarceration.

  26. At least it's not another trans child or pro pedophile video from TED. This channel used to be good but it's mostly garbage these days

  27. …I could blame my felony convictions on this, being as I've had said incidences of brain injuries as early as 7yo… but funnily enough, I was deported over 20 years ago and haven't committed a single crime since then… I was in a gang in high school, fought and got beaten up a lot, did a lot of crime and did a lot of time… why is it then that my criminal behavior ended as soon as I was kicked out of the states…??? I mean, if there was any factual truth to this person's bull, my pursuance of criminal behavior would have continued, wouldn't it…?? STOP DRINKING THE KOOL-AID !!!!

  28. Up to 80% of Incarcerated persons have traumatic brain injuries. Brain scans look like retired football players. Their cognitive deficit, make it hard to function and keeps them in prison. With simple accommodations people are staying out of prison. #TEDTalk https://twitter.com/tedstalkin

  29. This is shocking information and the statistics at such high extent cannot be wrong. This problem must be closely looked at, it would change our society's whole perception of criminality. Studies must be undertaken that verify these findings and reports must be passed on to Police Forces and Departments of Justice. This cannot be ignored !

  30. I've worked as a contract medical personnel in both private and state prisons over a period of 10 yrs. I was well aware that many of the inmate had a history of head injuries, I had no idea it was as high as mentioned in this talk, but it doesn't surprise to learn this statistics. In my experience there was little assistance, with in the frame work of the Institute, for inmate these inmates. Some were very good at identifying and seeking out help from staff that were interested and willing to help them with a plan to be more independent and functional at succeeding at goals to improve their situation.

  31. Thank you! It seems you have found a good explanation and solution for why so many people end up in prison for simple acts.

  32. How is it surprising? Doctors have known for decades that the frontal lobe is mainly responsible for impulse control & other factors associated with our judgement & personality. That means that people who have damaged their brains with drugs & alcohol or those with injuries due to trauma can have behavioral changes. Remember the story of the guy who survived a steel spike through his head but then went from a regular liked guy to being so obnoxious & mean that no one liked him anymore? That's why professional football players & boxers have such a reputation for violence. (In the old days steroids were known to play a part, too, but athletes who injured their heads more often had statistically more problems with violence than those who did sports/activities where they did steroids too but had less head injuries, like weightlifters.)

  33. I bet most police officers or jail guard were either bullies or bullied in school I wonder what that statistic is

  34. I have TBI from penetrating head injury, and I relate to so much of this, except in the corporate world, punished over and over for not being able to cognitively be like the average guy. I can do my work, and exceed expectations, but I can’t succeed when they micromanage and try to force me to adopt their cognitive patterns and routines. … they’re designed to heavily rely on their non-damaged memory

  35. Thank you so much! This information is truly eye opening for me. Another piece of the puzzle, another step in the right direction and… a whole lot more hope. ❤

  36. You are all being played………..sorry guys……..need to wake up……..not sucking it up………head bangers are not self-fulfilling terminal freaks……got that!
    Conclusion all corrupt people are brain damage? Oh Yeah???????? Sorry if you are not up to simple LOGIC. (criminals made their choices they are told in prison).
    So tell me why would all of humanity be brain damaged if they are innately corrupt. Do you realise yet that you and "mankind" have a basic problem? Yes, good?
    No BAD!!!! Check the narrative? It is being twisted big time. Climate warming is another great hoax to hit people with taxes. Check Western budgets.Surprise
    coming to a country you are in. Thought for today…."Are you a 'prisoner' in your own nation and free of all corruption?"

  37. Excellent information!!! I wonder how much other forms of trauma, such as emotional and psychological trauma, factor into crime.

  38. What about other way round… peoples with impulse control or antisocial personality,someone of whom are already criminal and engage in physical voilence causing TBI … definitely tbi causes some irreversible organic changes leading to voilent behaviour but other way round is quite apt.

  39. I'm so happy you're speaking on this topic; back in 1981 I sustained a TBI, and while I didn't go on to a life of crime—beyond a few incidents of civil disobedience—I have to say the misunderstanding of my condition has caused me no end of problems—impulsivity and depression among them. People have often asked me, "Why are you the way you are?" and I have no answer.

    Agitation is a huge problem with brain injuries; it was with mine. So glad you addressed this.

  40. We're raised to believe 'can't means won't'.   Just dropping that un-human idea would make a difference.

  41. Here's the classic liberal agenda, find isolated examples, exploit it emotionally, weaponize sentiments for anyone that disagrees with them, then underhandedly apply it to the general population to serve their interest. The prison population needs hard labor whether it's forced or not like no other population in the world…. If you disagree with me you're an ignorant self righteous piece of s***. but none of this matters because it is written that self-righteous liberal idiots will win the day for their time… And then comes the end…..

  42. This literally reminds me the Chris Benoit severe crime, the diving headbutt affected his brain so far

  43. See you mean to tell me that the only way you can have a traumatic brain injury is if you go to the hospital after the fact can you have a traumatic brain injury and not receive medical attention and live?

  44. I think we need a tedtalk about taking psychedelics with other people and the transference of psychology that goes on

  45. The prison industrial complex will no doubt refute such science as it stands to lose billions. I would like to have seen more studies upon studies supporting the connection between TBI and getting locked up in this talk. The speaker seemed to jump rather quickly from the assertion to solutions.

  46. I had a TDI 11 years ago, and spent a year in a blind rage with no control over my emotions. My wife risked her own sanity to bring me back, and without her love and support I have no doubt I'd be in jail or homeless. I carry a voice recorder and take notes of what I really need to remember. The hardest thing I ever did was fight to regain control over my emotions, as for helping my memory I went back to college to get a civil engineering diploma

  47. Very good presentation. I would respectfully submit that this could go beyond physical trauma. Is it possible the brain can also be traumatized by significant drug use? Also I see a link with the emotional side of trauma. When it is unresolved we tend to get stuck in the "revolving door" – it tends to come back to haunt us. All these things are linked. I believe similarities are also seen with respect to PTSD.

  48. Famous killers Charles Starkweather and Richard Hickock had head injuries. There have been many more.

  49. What she is saying about behavior is true for everyone. We all need to know our strengths and our weaknesses. The main reason people have long term problems in life is not being able to recognize what they do not do well. From money to relationships to education (of any kind). One of the best classes I went through was for managers where we learned about ourselves. If you do not know how to manage yourself, you will be rather challenged at managing yourself.

  50. OMG… I was hit in the face with a softball that caused a concussion. Then it started making me faint and hit my head on corners and injuring myself more. I kept getting myself arrested in my early 20s. I've come a long way since the (I'm 33) but I still have problems with impulse control. It bothers me bc I am very intelligent and a very empathetic person… but there are something to this day that make me question myself after the fact.

  51. l only ser 2 ways to solve prisoners' Lives better bay being in prisional, 1 wering nanotechnology braceletes wateched by satellites and frees .2 prison for only 1 people divided of bars to avoid physical contact with each other!☀️

  52. whene I was 2 I fell and cracked my head open pretty bad . and my parents told me that I was acting differently since. could it be because of tbi?

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